Bullseye with Jesse Thorn
Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

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The Craziest Day of my Entire Career is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite people about some truly unbelievable stories. This time around, we’re joined by novelist and creator of the hit HBO show “Bored to Death” Jonathan Ames.



For the better part of a decade, the video game industry has made more in revenue than Hollywood. Year after year, it’s not even close. Some of the biggest blockbuster games can pull down a billion dollars within a week of being released, and they can continue making money for years afterwards. But video games can take enormous amounts of work to produce, and because the industry is notoriously opaque, studios can sometimes become toxic workplaces. That’s where Jason Schreier has made his career: Instead of writing reviews or reporting on player communities, he investigates the studios that make games. He’s uncovered labor abuses, creative and legal disputes behind the scenes, and all sorts of workplace misconduct. And he does it by going directly to the workers involved. His new book, Press Reset, is his latest work in that field. Based on dozens of interviews with people who make games, it tells the origin stories of some of the most renowned video game studios in the world — and how those same studios eventually collapsed.


Ann Dowd is a veteran actor. Her career began on the stage, first in Chicago, where she went to school, then in New York. She started appearing on screen in the ’90s in shows like “The Baby-Sitter’s Club” and “Law & Order.” As she has continued her acting journey, she has starred in many memorable parts including her roles in the HBO series “The Leftovers” and the 2012 film “Compliance.” She may be best known for her role as the sadistic Aunt Lydia in the hit series “The Handmaid’s Tale,” which earned her an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series. She joins guest host Linda Holmes to chat about the new season of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” similarities between some of the different roles she’s played, and when she made the switch from studying medicine in school to studying acting. Plus, she’ll talk a little bit about her new film “Mass” which premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival.


The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. This time around, we’re joined by American jazz trumpeter Carl Hilding “Doc” Severinsen. Doc is an amazing trumpet player who led the band over at “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” for thirty years and almost the entirety of Carson’s run. He’s known for his impeccable-styled costumes and eclectic musical styles. He’s recorded with Eddie Fisher, Dinah Shore and still tours at 93 years old. He’s had an enchanted career that extends all the way back to the second world war where a chance encounter gave him the opportunity to play for his childhood idol—trombonist Tommy Dorsey. Catch “Never Too Late: The Doc Severinsen Story” on your local PBS station.


Rick Prelinger is an archivist and professor at UC Santa Cruz. He’s a collector of found and discarded footage: home movies, outtakes from industrial videos and never before seen b-roll from old feature films. Rick also co-founded the Prelinger Library in San Francisco. It’s one of the largest collections of ephemeral films in the world. In the film series Lost Landscapes, Rick compiles footage from his archives to create documentaries about changing cities. He’s covered San Francisco, Los Angeles, Oakland, Detroit and more. We talk with Rick about his film series, how he curates his archives and his passion for all things ephemeral. Plus, shares a story about the time he found a video of himself at 5 years old in someone else’s home movies.


William Jackson Harper won the hearts of fans as the sweet philosophy professor Chidi Anagonye on NBC’s “The Good Place.” The role helped jump start his career and earned him a handful of award nominations including an Emmy nod. In 2019, he also starred in the critically acclaimed horror film “Midsommar.” His latest project is a leading role alongside Aya Cash in the romantic comedy “We Broke Up.” He’s also set to appear in the upcoming Amazon series “The Underground Railroad,” which is directed by Barry Jenkins. He joins guest host Linda Holmes of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour to talk about his new film and upcoming projects, “The Good Place,” some of the TV shows he’s been binging and a new hobby he’s picked up during the pandemic. Plus, they’ll chat about his love for scary movies and dive into some of his favorite horror films and thrillers.


Ric Burns has written, produced, and directed many documentaries over the last 25 years that capture fascinating narratives about different topics in American history. A few subjects he’s covered include New York City, The American Civil War, The Chinese Exclusion Act, and many more. His latest documentary explores the life, work, and legacy of the legendary neurologist and bestselling author Oliver Sacks. After being diagnosed with terminal cancer in early 2015, Sacks approached Burns about creating a documentary to tell his life’s story. Ric Burns chats with Jesse about his experience working closely with Oliver Sacks on the project before his passing in August of 2015. He also talks about how creating this film alongside Sacks changed him as a person and the way he sees the world.


Raoul Peck makes sweeping, breathtaking, insightful films that marry the political to the personal to tell beautiful stories about the triumphs and failings of the human condition. Born in Port-au-Prince, he is the first Haitian filmmaker ever to have a feature film shown in the US. He’s made both documentaries and feature films including 2000’s “Lumumba,” 2016’s Oscar-nominaed “I Am Not Your Negro” and 2017’s “The Young Karl Marx.” His latest project is a HBO docu series titled “Exterminate All the Brutes.” We revisit our 2018 conversation with the auteur to discuss the difficulty of telling complex political stories, he’ll share his experience as a young boy surviving a dictatorship and why knowledge is the enemy of terror. Plus, he’ll share with us how his father’s story impacted his filmmaking.


Nicole Byer on hosting game shows, staying busy and how the pandemic has changed how she works Nicole Byer is a force of nature. She hosts the game shows Nailed It on Netflix and Wipeout on TBS. She hosts four podcasts. She hosts four — FOUR! — podcasts: Why Won’t You Date Me, Newcomers, 90 […]


British comedy duo David Mitchell and Robert Webb have been making audiences laugh for over two decades. They began their career performing on stage and eventually transitioned to the world of television with their breakout sketch comedy shows “The Mitchell and Webb Situation” and “That Mitchell and Webb Look.” In 2003, they starred on the hit British sitcom “Peep Show,” which helped bring them to international audiences. The series ran for nine seasons and received several awards. In 2017 they reunited for the sitcom “Back,” which is now in its second season. Mitchell and Webb join Bullseye to talk about their latest show, their experiences performing together as a double act over the years, and why they often create “unpleasant” characters in their shows. Near the end of the interview, we also talk with Robert Webb about some controversial tweets he posted in 2018 and later deleted that criticized a charity that provides care and support for transgender and gender nonconforming kids.


Killer Mike first joined Bullseye all the way back in 2009. Since then, he’s formed the supergroup Run the Jewels with partner El-P, he’s appeared in films like Baby Driver and he hosted his own television series “Trigger Warning with Killer Mike” on Netflix. The Grammy-awarded rapper also finds time to stay pretty politically active. We revisit our 2019 conversation with Mike where he sat down with us to chat about freestyling for Big Boi, his college regrets and style-flipping as a 30+ rapper. Plus, he’ll tell us why the south still has something to say. That’s on the next Bullseye.


Adam McKay’s had a pretty eclectic career. He started in sketch comedy. First as a founder of the Upright Citizens Brigade, then as a writer on Saturday Night Live. He’s collaborated with Will Ferrell to make some stone cold comedy classics: AnchormanStep BrothersTalladega Nights. Lately, his work has been more topical and political. We’re revisiting our conversation with Adam this week. When we talked in 2019, he’d just directed Vice – a biopic about Dick Cheney. Vice explains why, for better or for worse, Cheney is one of the most consequential people in recent history. In this conversation, Adam explained how he manages to keep his films fresh, funny and weird even when the topics are more serious. Plus, he shared some tales in improv comedy from his time at Second City in Chicago. Adam’s latest project is a podcast called Death at the Wing, you can find it wherever you get podcasts.


The post-punk band Gang of Four was an unstoppable force of danceable beats, abrasive guitar work and unflinchingly political lyrics. Formed in the late 70s in Leeds, England, core of the operation was vocalist Jon King and guitarist Andy Gill. King and Gill were childhood friends and lifelong collaborators, and their work influenced a generation of rock music. Bullseye guest host Jordan Morris interviewed King about the band’s box set, Gang of Four 77-81, as well as his early influences and what it’s like to be sampled by Run the Jewels.


When you think of actor Christopher Lloyd, what’s the first film of his that comes to mind? Is it the “Back to the Future” franchise where he starred as the unforgettable inventor Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown? Perhaps it’s the 1988 live action/animated film “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” where he took on the terrifying role as Judge Doom? Maybe it’s not a film at all, but rather the beloved sitcom series “Taxi” where he starred as the oddball New York City cab driver “Reverend” Jim Ignatowski. Christopher Lloyd has performed in a number of iconic roles over the years and at the age of 82 he has no plans to stop anytime soon. Jesse recently spoke with the Hollywood veteran about his remarkable career in acting and why he continues to do it. They also talked about his new film “Senior Moment” where he stars alongside William Shatner and Jean Smart.


Riz Ahmed has spent the last decade pursuing dual careers in acting and hip-hop. His work has been political, controversial, funny, subtle — the sort of stuff critics love — and it’s found huge audiences, despite all that controversy. He started in British independent movies like suicide-bomber comedy Four Lions, acted in a Star Wars movie, and now has made history as the first Muslim actor to earn an Oscar nomination for Best Actor. As if all that wasn’t enough, he’s also a pretty good MC! When we talked in 2016, he had just released an album as part of the hip-hop duo Swet Shop Boys.


With a little help from the smash hit “Cannonball” on their 1993 album “Last Splash,” The Breeders became one of the biggest names in early ‘90s alternative rock. In 2018, we chatted with the band’s lead guitarist and singer Kim Deal. She talked about the music scene in her hometown of Dayton, Ohio, how unintended her success was, transitioning from the Pixies to The Breeders, and what it felt like the first moment she realized that she had written a song that people wanted to dance to. She also talked about The Breeders reuniting for “All Nerve,” their first project in almost a decade, which dropped in 2018.


Have you seen the latest Spike Lee Joint Da 5 Bloods? It’s one of the best movies of 2020. It follows the story of four Black Vietnam war veterans who return to Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City. Officially, they’re looking for the remains of their fallen squad leader. Unofficially… they’ve returned in search of buried treasure left behind during the war. Delroy Lindo’s portrayal of war veteran Paul completely steals the show. It’s an emotional, raw depiction of a very complex person who’s been through immense trauma. The performance is breathtaking. Returning to the land which caused all of them so much pain opens old wounds and reignites unresolved heartache. Public radio veteran Ray Suarez talks with Delroy Lindo about Da 5 Bloods. Delroy reflects on the previous times he worked with Spike Lee almost two decades ago. Plus, Delroy was born in London, spent part of his life in Canada, and only came to the US in his late teen years. He talks about how that experience has influenced his craft.


We’re honored to be joined by Nikki Giovanni. The Grammy-award winning poet, essayist and professor at Virginia Tech University has been creating beautiful prose that knocks us off our feet since the 1960s. She’s worked with James Baldwin, Maya Angelou and Mohammad Ali. Oprah considers her to be a “living legend.” Her powerful prose will catch you off-guard if you’re not careful. Her words speak truth to power. Her words emancipate the mind, the body and the soul! Her latest collection of poems is called “Make Me Rain.” Nikki joins Bullseye to talk about the first poem she can remember writing, overcoming teenage angst and why she’s not afraid—excited even—to find life on Mars. Plus, she’ll tell us why never being satisfied can be toxic.


He goes by many names: Forty Fonzarelli, Charlie Hustle, 40-Water or maybe you know him as the Ambassador of the Bay Area. When it comes to Bay Area hip-hop, E-40 quite possibly the greatest of all time. His distinctiveness has kept him relevant for three decades now, from mob music in the 1990’s to hyphy slaps in the aughts to new music today. A couple months ago E-40 put out a brand new record with another Bay Area veteran: Too $hort – it’s called Ain’t Gone Do It. We’re taking the time to revisit our conversation with E-40 from 2019. When he joined us we pulled up some deep cuts from R&B singer Saint Charles, who 40 knows as his Uncle Chuckie. Plus, he talked about his college days at Grambling State University.


Kathryn Hahn shows up just when you need her most in some of our favorite television series and movies of the past 15 years! She’s appeared in “Step Brothers” and “Anchorman,” in “Parks and Recreation” as political whiz Jennifer Barkley, as Rabbi Raquel Fein in “Transparent” and she stole the show in the recent Marvel hit “WandaVision” on Disney+ as nosy neighbor Agnes. She can do drama, comedy, action villain—she pretty much does it all! When she joined us in 2017 she was starring opposite Kevin Bacon in the Joey Soloway adaptation of the Chris Kraus novel, “I Love Dick.” Kathryn talks to Bullseye with Jesse Thorn about tapping into her own obsessions to get into character, playing complicated women and how her children helped strengthen her creativity. Plus, she’ll tell us about that time she had a crush on Jesus Christ!


The Craziest Day of my Entire Career is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite people about some truly unbelievable stories. This time around, we’re joined by the comedian Kate Willett. Her debut, Glass Gutter, was one of our favorite albums from the last few years. She’s followed that album up with an Audible Original series called Dirtbag Anthropology. It’s a deeply personal funny series where Kate talks plainly about her life story: losing partners to divorce, to death, about what it’s like to be a queer comic. When we asked Kate about the craziest day in her entire career she shared a story about a friend she met in grade school. They had lost touch over the years, but one day she was performing stand-up and an audience member recognized her. Things only got stranger after that. Kate Willett’s Audible Original, Dirtbag Anthropology is available now.


We’re joined by film directors Tomm Moore and Ross Stewart—creators of the new animated film “Wolfwalkers.” The film is the third installment in their Irish folklore trilogy that includes 2009’s “The Secret of Kells” and 2014’s “Song of the Sea.” Their latest follows the story of a young apprentice hunter named Robin as she bridges the world between an emerging 17th century colonized Ireland and the mysterious wolves said to be overrunning the lush woods that surround her family’s town of Kilkenny. The film is lush, thought-provoking and adventurous. Tomm and Ross chat with Jesse Thorn about their breathtaking film, the films that inspired them as children and their own relationships to Irish folklore. Plus, they’ll tell us what cartoon they consider the perfect stoner movie.


Born in Los Angeles’ Crenshaw District, Terrace Martin found a love for hip-hop early on. The kids growing up around him were freestyling and playing in backyard shows. He grew up in a jazz household, and got his start as a saxophonist, too. With those two backgrounds, Terrace kicked off a career that would make him a trailblazing polymath in pop music. He’s worked with rappers like Snoop Dogg, YG and Murs. He was heavily involved in Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly, producing many songs on the album including the hit King Kunta. We’re revisiting our conversation from 2017. At the time, he’d just released The Sounds of Crenshaw Volume 1 with his band, the Pollyseeds. In 2020, he released seven EPs – including Village Days, and Dinner Party late last year. When he joined us we talked about his thoughts on hip-hop, and jazz that’s taught in academic settings. Plus, why working with Kendrick Lamar was so important to him.


Documentary filmmaker Errol Morris has a very unique style of storytelling. Part of his creative process includes the use of a device he invented called a “Interrotron.” It allows the subjects of his films to look at him, the interviewer, while also looking straight into the camera, creating the sense that his subjects are addressing the viewer directly. He’s been lauded among the film community as a visionary and his film debut, 1978’s “Gates of Heaven” is required viewing in film schools across the country. Since then, he’s made “The Thin Blue Line,” The Fog of War” and the 2014 Netflix series “Wormwood.” Revisit our 2014 conversation with the acclaimed director on why “Wormwood” is like an “Everything bagel,” capturing the art of the story and how the mid 20th century inspires his obsession with retrospective filmmaking. Plus, why he enjoys f*cking with people. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


We’re joined by Christian Jacobs, aka MC Bat Commander. He’s the frontman for the SoCal band The Aquabats. The band got their start in the ska scene in the mid 1990s. Today, they perform as a genre-bending, family-friendly band with a lot of theatrics, costumes and pageantry. Christian is also the co-creator of the “The Aquabats! Super Show!” and the beloved children’s program “Yo Gabba Gabba.” Their latest album, “Kooky Spooky… In Stereo” continues the band’s tradition of great rock sounds with superhero-themed fun! Christian joins Bullseye with guest host Jordan Morris to talk about his earliest musical memories, the theatrics of punk music and the origin of the band’s name. Plus, we’ll learn about how they booked their first show before writing a single song!


Holly Hunter’s had unforgettable roles in some of the best movies of the last 30 years. She’s been nominated for several Academy Awards for her roles in films like ThirteenThe Firm, and Broadcast News. Her role in 1993’s The Piano earned her an Academy Award. She starred in O Brother, Where Art Thou? and Raising Arizona – two Coen Brothers classics! Her latest role is as Arpi Meskimen on Mr. Mayor, the new sitcom from Tina Fey and Robert Carlock. Holly’s one of the most talented actors in the game, and we’re thrilled to share this conversation. We talk about the new sitcom Mr. Mayor. Plus, we’ll dive into her portrayal of Jane Craig in Broadcast News. She’ll also throw us back to the time she had just moved to New York City and was roommates with Jason Alexander, long before they had their breaks in showbiz.


Buckle up folks, it’s about to get weird and maybe even a little bit icky! Dr. Sydnee McElroy and Justin McElroy are here to share all the weird and fascinating stories most of us have never heard about medicine through the ages. They’re the hosts of the Maximum Fun podcast, Sawbones and they joined Jesse in 2018 to talk about why they started the podcast, how medicine evolved from balancing humours to germ theory, and how in spite of all our advances, we still can’t cure hiccups! Plus Justin explains what a “zzyzx” is. That’s on the next Bullseye!


Actor Steven Yeun played fan-favorite Glenn Rhee for 6 years on AMC’s wildly popular series “The Walking Dead.” He’s also appeared in critically-acclaimed films “Okja,” “Sorry to Bother You” and 2020’s “Minari.” He joined Bullseye in 2018 to talk about his work in “Burning”— a film that earned him a Best Supporting Actor award from the National Society of Film Critics. Steven chats with Jesse about TWD fan culture, growing up in Detroit and how unpacking the minefields of assimilation impacted his adult life. Plus, he’ll share with us the second-best hockey comeback story of the 90s. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


All Creatures Great and Small tells the story of a Scottish veterinarian who moves out to the English countryside. It started as a book series written under the pen name James Herriot. In each chapter, Herriot drives around the Yorkshire Dales in an old car, from farm to farm, appointment to appointment. He treats horses, cows and dogs in neighboring villages. In the ’70s and ’80s, the books became a TV series of the same name on the BBC. All Creatures set in the ’30s, between the wars. It’s a quiet series – gentle, funny and bursting with love. There’s a brand new television series based on the book. We talk about the latest reiteration with Ben Vanstone, writer and showrunner who created the reboot. There’s quite a few animals on the show, but who’s Ben’s favorite? All that and so much more on the latest episode.


From his role as the lovable Sam Malone on the classic sitcom Cheers to his role as the lovable demon, Michael on The Good Place, Ted Danson has made an indelible mark on our hearts playing the mischievous cad you can’t help but love. He talks with Jesse about his new show, Mr. Mayor, growing up in Tucson, and what he hopes happens when he dies. Plus, Ted tells us why you never let comedy writers know your secrets.


We’re joined by filmmaker and documentarian John Wilson, creator of the series, “How To with John Wilson.” Each episode, masquerading as a tutorial on how to do things such as improve your memory, or make the perfect risotto, centers around the New York City native as he documents the complexity of city life. It’s raw, quirky and absolutely hilarious. John joins Bullseye to chat about finishing a season of television during a pandemic, the nuance he found in his personal life from the edit process and making real life seem “less fake.” Plus, we’ll find out just how much of his life is dedicated to shooting the footage for his show.


Fran Lebowitz has lived in New York City pretty much her entire life. Her written work often provided American social commentary through her unique lens as a New Yorker. While her work is now iconic, it’s been decades since she last published written works. These days she makes a living talking. She talks about politics, about New York and how it’s changed. Fran also, kind of personifies New York City. Which makes her the perfect subject of the new Netflix docuseries Pretend It’s a City. In the seven part series, Martin Scorsese chats with Fran about a number of topics including her relationship with New York – Manhattan in particular. Fran joins guest host Julie Klausner to discuss the new TV series about her. They cover a lot of ground including Fran’s thoughts on: the Camp exhibit at the Met, outdoor dining, Dr. Fauci and more!


Comedian Natalie Palamides joins Bullseye this week to talk with guest host Carrie Poppy! Natalie and Carrie talk about Natalie’s new Netflix special Nate: A One Man Show, what her parents think of her raunchy stand-up, and choosing to commit to your art over commercial projects. Plus, Natalie tells us about the occupational hazards of wrestling random audience members on stage. That’s on the next Bullseye!


This week, we’re joined by actor Isiah Whitlock Jr. He played the morally compromised “Clay Davis” in the iconic television series “The Wire.” He’s also appeared in some of our favorite films including “Goodfellas,” “Gremlins 2: The New Batch,” “25th Hour” and last year’s “Da 5 Bloods.” His latest project teams him up with Bryan Cranston in the new Showtime series “Your Honor.” Isiah chats with Jesse Thorn about landing a role in “Goodfellas,” how he came to embrace his signature catchphrase and playing complicated characters. Plus, we’ll ask him about playing 12 different characters in the “Law and Order” universe. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


Robert Glasper is a Grammy award-winning pianist, producer and songwriter. He’s worked with some of the biggest names in hip-hop from Kanye West to Common. Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly features some of his outstanding keyboard work. To date, he’s earned three Grammy awards and is up for another two this year – best R&B song for “Better Than I Imagined” and best R&B Album for, F–k Yo Feelings. We’re revisiting our conversation from 2012. At the time he’d just released one of his most acclaimed albums to date: Black Radio. Robert Glasper reflects on his longtime friendship and most memorable collaborations with Bilal. He also dives into the evolution of jazz , and how he sees himself in that world. And if you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to party with Ludacris in Atlanta – he has the answer.


This week we’re revisiting our 2019 conversation with rapper Freddie Gibbs. Freddie joined us to talk about his childhood growing up in Gary, Indiana, carving out space for himself as a rapper from the Midwest, and how he always knew that one day he’d be famous. Plus, he tells us about how he met his MadGibbs collaborator, producer Madlib.


We’re joined by comedian and actor Michael Ian Black on an all-new Bullseye! He’s a founding member of the comedy groups “The State” and “Stella” as well as a regular on the kind of talking head pop culture shows that were all the rage in the late aughts. When he’s not busy making us laugh on stage and screen, Michael is a prolific author. His first book, a children’s book, was titled “Chicken Cheeks” and was the first of many books geared toward kids. He’s also written several books for adults. His latest is “A Better Man.” It’s a touching long-form letter to his teenage son about the perils and pitfalls of manhood and what it means to be a man in a society that often attempts to pigeonhole what manhood is allowed to look like. Black chats with guest host Carrie Poppy about raising a son and daughter, the lessons he’s learned and how his mother’s tumultuous past impacted how he sees the world.


We’re back with our first new episode of the year! It’s already one of our favorites in recent memory. Actor Glynn Turman talks with us about his extraordinary life. You might know him as Clarence Royce on The Wire, or Doctor Senator on the most recent season of Fargo. And he’s had a number of iconic roles in films like in Gremlins and Cooley High. He stars in Netflix’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, it’s a film adaptation of the August Wilson play of the same name. The story centers on a fateful recording session of “Mother of the Blues” by Ma Rainey in 1927 Chicago. Glynn’s been in the game for over half a century – he reflects on his past roles and future ambitions. We also discuss what it was like working with Chadwick in his final film role. Plus, he shares an incredible story about how he met his second wife … Aretha Franklin.


It’s the most hilarious time of the year again! That’s right, we’re back for another End of Year Comedy special. This holiday season the staff at MaxFun HQ listened to countless hours of stand-up, considered thousands of punchlines, and subjected our funny bones to innumerable tickles so that we could deliver only the very best stand-up comedy of 2020 to you! So sit back, relax, and get ready to laugh. You’ve made it through 2020, you’ve earned it.


“Canonball” is a segment on Bullseye that gives us a chance to take a closer look at albums that should be considered classics, to find out what makes them great. This time, Margaret Wappler makes the case for why Bjork’s 1995 record “Post” deserves to be added to the canon of classic albums.


Dick Van Dyke has been entertaining the public for over 70 years. He’s a legend of stage and screen – The Dick Van Dyke ShowMary PoppinsBye Bye Birdie and so many more… and he’s still performing today. He turned 95 this month. We’re taking a moment to celebrate his career by revisiting our interview with him from 2015. Dick Van Dyke talked about being a comedy legend and of course, we dove into his legacy working on some of the most iconic roles in entertainment. Plus, life before working on television and finding his footing during the dawn of television.


It’s here! Bullseye’s Holiday Spectacular has finally arrived and it’s a jam packed episode! This year features interviews with guests like musician and actor Andrew Bird, actor and musician, Anika Noni Rose, and hosts of the new MaxFun podcast Tiny Victories, Laura House and Annabelle Gurwitch. Plus, the McElroy brothers join Jesse to offer up some holiday advice in true My Brother, My Brother and Me style. So put on your reindeer headphones and settle in for a bonanza of holiday cheer!


Adrian Tomine is the author and illustrator behind the comic book series Optic Nerve which began publication in 1991— first as a self-published work and later as a collection of books by Drawn & Quarterly. He’s also created several classic covers for The New Yorker. His latest book is an illustrated memoir called The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist. Adrian joins Bullseye guest host Brian Heater to talk about how making comics prepared him for screenwriting, trying to do a book tour during a pandemic and what’s next for him. Plus, he’ll talk to us about that infamous Fresh Air interview. All that and more on the next Bullseye


Roman Mars hosts the radio show and podcast 99% Invisible. It’s a show about the little known stories behind everyday design and architecture. Prefabricated homes. Trash can design. Even those little ramps you see on sidewalk corners: how and why did stuff like that come to be? He just released a new book based on the podcast – it’s called the 99 Percent Invisible City. The book is an illustrated look at how cities work, and why they work the way they do. Roman Mars joins us to talk about life before podcasting, and what decades in radio has taught him. Plus, the COVID-19 Pandemic has affected the design of cities, and which of those changes might be permanent.


This week we’re revisiting our 2017 conversation with musician Phil Elverum. Phil is a singer-songwriter best known for the music he records as the bands the Microphones and Mount Eerie. Earlier this year he released a new album titled Microphones in 2020. He joined Jesse to talk about grieving the loss of his first wife, cartoonist Geneviève Castrée, and how a trip British Columbia with his daughter inspired the album A Crow Looked at Me.


Singer-songwriter Ani DiFranco has been making music since she was a teenager. For decades now, she’s recorded and released her music on her own label, Righteous Babe Records. Her music is both autobiographical and political, with influences from funk, rock, jazz and punk. She’s released over 20 albums so far and her latest, “Revolutionary Love,” will be available in January. Ani joins Jesse to talk about breaking away from self-sufficiency, writing beautiful music and taking time off from the road, Plus, she’ll tell us what it feels like to jam with the one and only Prince!


Carrie Coon is an actor best known for her roles on TV. You’ve seen her as Nora on HBO’s The Leftovers. No one was as fearless and bold as Nora. She was angry and kind of tightly wound, traumatized by the loss of her entire family. In Season 3 of Fargo, Carrie played Police Chief Gloria Burgle: brave in the face of danger, but also baffled at humanity’s capacity to be so violent and cruel. In her latest role, she’s starring on the big screen in The Nest alongside Jude Law. In the film, a cross-continental move tears a marriage apart. Linda Holmes, the host of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour, talked with Carrie Coon recently about The Nest. Plus, Carrie also discusses how she got into acting and she describes her wedding – which is perhaps the most unconventional ceremony you’ve ever heard.


Actor and comedian David Cross is our guest! While you may know him best for his stand-up comedy and roles on shows like Arrested Development and Mr. Show, David joins Jesse to talk about his newest endeavor – a dramatic role in the new film The Dark Divide. He talks about the mental and physical challenges of playing that role, growing up in Georgia, and his enduring relationship with Mr. Show co-creator, Bob Odenkirk. Plus, why he’d describe his new movie, The Dark Divide, as an “underpants heavy” film.


This week, our guest is David Letterman. The one and only. He and Jesse talk about the Late Show, about his triumphs and failures, and his latest TV show: My Next Guest Needs No Introduction, on Netflix.


We’re joined by rapper A$AP Ferg of the A$AP Mob. Born Darold Durard Brown Ferguson Jr., he grew up in Harlem in an area dubbed “Hungry Ham.” His music is hard to define but if you had to you’d need to include hip hop, trap, dubstep, house and soul. He’s helped to redefine the term “New York rapper.” His latest album is called Floor Seats 2. Ferg joined Bullseye in 2017 to talk about growing up in New York, attending performing arts school, his chance encounter with the late ASAP Yams and collaborating with the great Missy Elliott. Plus, he’ll tell us why he loves the legend and the magic behind Madonna. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


Rob Halford is a legend in the world of metal music. He is the lead vocalist of heavy metal group Judas Priest. He recently released an autobiography called Confess. In it, he shares some truly incredible stories: like the time he handcuffed himself to Andy Warhol or when he explained heavy-metal to Queen Elizabeth. We’re revisiting our interview with Rob from 2009. In this conversation Rob Halford reflects on the legacy of Judas Priest. Plus, coming to terms with his queer identity and his coming out within the metal community. We also talked about holiday music. When Rob joined us he had just released the heavy metal holiday record – Halford III – Winter Songs. If you’re looking for more alternative holiday tunes check out Celestial by Rob Halford with Family & Friends from last year.


Musician Laura Jane Grace joins Bullseye this week! She talks with Max Fun’s Jordan, Jesse, GO! co-host, Jordan Morris about her new album, Stay Alive. Laura fronts the punk band Against Me! and super-fan Jordan chats with her about her early days playing shows in a laundromat, her enduring love of Guns N’ Roses, and what it’s like to record and album while in quarantine!


These days it might seem like we’re in a bit of a time-loop. Days feel like months. Months feel like an eternity. That’s probably what makes Hulu’s Palm Springs the perfect movie for this time. It’s a romantic comedy about two people who are forced to repeat the same day. The film stars Andy Samberg as Nyles, and Cristin Milioti, as Sarah. It’s a funny and unique movie about relationships and depression. Linda Holmes, the host of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour, talked with Cristin Milioti recently about the complex portrayal of Sarah in Palm Springs. They try their best to discuss the movie’s themes without spoiling too much of the plot. Linda also chats with Cristin about her roles on shows like How I Met Your Mother30 RockFargo, and the Tony Award winning Broadway show Once.


It’s a very special Halloween Spooktacular edition of Bullseye! We revisit our 2017 conversation with Cassandra Peterson, the woman behind Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She’ll talk with Jesse about The Groundlings and creating the aesthetic behind her iconic character, her childhood growing up in the midwest and what it’s like inhabiting such a sexual role. Next up, a very special visit from comedian Andy Daly (Review, Reno 911, Bob’s Burgers), with the song that changed his life: the Monster Mash! Plus, De mero mero de Navidad pauses the Christmas movies for a moment to give us a Halloween treat! That’s right, Alonso Duralde and April Wolfe from Maximum Fun’s Who Shot Ya podcast and Switchblade Sisters share their favorite spooky flicks, and Jesse recommends a classic Halloween track!


This week we are revisiting our conversation with musician Tom Fec, better known by his stage name, Tobacco. His latest album, Hot Wet & Sassy comes out at the end of October. Tom joined Jesse last year to talk about his musical influences, his creative process, and why he rejects the label of psychedelic rock. Plus he tells us why you’ll occasionally find him and his bandmates in Black Moth Super Rainbow performing concerts in masks.


Padma Lakshmi is a model, actress and the host of Top Chef on Bravo. She’s the person telling everyone to pack their knives and go home. Her latest television series is Taste the Nation With Padma Lakshmi on Hulu. Each episode, Padma travels to a different part of the United States to highlight an immigrant community. The show celebrates different cultures and their place in American cuisine. The results of the conversations she has often reveal stories that challenge notions of identity, and what it means to be American. We’re revisiting our conversation with Padma from 2016. When she joined us she discussed cultural differences she had to reckon with growing up between India and the United States, and her role on Top Chef.


We're joined by Kyle Kinane who chats with Jesse about his latest comedy special Trampoline in a Ditch. It was recorded in 2019. His voice is probably most well-known from his work on Comedy Central but did you know he was also in a punk band? Kyle joins Bullseye to chat about challenging himself and his audience with new topics, being the voice of Comedy Central and how the mid-90s punk scene prepared him for the analytical nature of comedy. All that and more on the next Bullseye!

Direct download: 20201016-KyleKinanePODCAST.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:45pm EDT

Actor Richard Jenkins joins guest host Jordan Morris on Bullseye this week. Among his many roles, Richard is perhaps best known for his supporting actor roles on critically acclaimed TV shows like Six Feet Under and movies like The Shape of Water. He joins us to talk about his new films, Kajillionaire and The Last Shift, the show he saw as a kid that sparked his interest in theatre, and what it's like to act with improv comedians like Will Ferrell. Plus, he tells us about his first job at a pizza joint!

Direct download: 20201013-RichardJenkinsPODCAST.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:36pm EDT

This week guest host Jordan Morris talks to musician Frank Turner, former frontman of the hardcore band Million Dead. Frank talks to Jordan about his new split album with punk legends NOFX, West Coast vs Wessex, the communal experience of singing around an acoustic guitar, and how The Clash inspired him to make a big life decision as a young man. Plus Frank tells us about the coolest thing an 11-year old can order from a catalog. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. This time around, we’re joined by Stephen Malkmus, the former frontman of Pavement. The band’s been called one of the best acts from the ’90s. The band broke up in 1999, and Malkmus has kept on, as prolific as ever, dropping 9 records since 2001. His latest record is out now, it’s called “Traditional Techniques.” When we asked him to dish on a song that made him who he is today , he kind of threw us a curveball. His pick: “Love Will Keep Us Together” by Captain & Tenille.


Ahead of their second season we’ll revisit our interview with “PEN15″‘s Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle. They are the stars and creators of the very funny Hulu show. It’s about two middle school girls coming to age in the early 2000s. The show deals with sensitive topics like getting your first period or being bullied but also has tons of heart and humor. Real-life best friends Maya and Anna join us to talk about what it’s like playing 13 year old versions of themselves, embracing the horrors of their shared middle school experiences and working with Maya’s real-life mom. Plus, we’ll chat about casting Al from “Home Improvement” to play Maya’s father. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


We’re looking back on our 2015 interview with musician Ernie Isley of legendary The Isley Brothers. Ernie talks to Jesse about the evolving sound of The Isley Brothers, a life-changing gig playing drums for Martha and The Vandellas, and what it was like to grow up with Jimi Hendrix occasionally living at your house.


Bootsy Collins is a legend in the world of funk. He’s a bassist who’s played in two genre defining bands: James Brown and the JB’s and Parliament.


This week, guest host Jordan Morris talks to Jeff VanderMeer about what inspires his writing.The NY Times Best-Selling author has a new book out that is a sort diversion from his norm. It’s targeted toward a younger audience but keeps all of the wonder and fun of his previous works. His 2014 novel, “Annihilation” won the Nebula award and was turned into a 2018 film of the ame name. Jordan chats with Jeff about how his writing process has evolved, what it’s like collaborating on projects after being self-published and what it’s like doing a book tour from home. Plus, we’ll ask him about how his parents shaped the way he looks at the world.


In case you haven’t heard: Bill and Ted are back! And today we’re joined by Alex Winter. Alex talks with Carrie Poppy about his new movie Bill & Ted Face the Music, his documentary about former child stars, Showbiz Kids, and why he left acting for 25 years. Plus, he’ll reveal what the “S” in Bill S. Preston Esq. stands for. San Dimas High School Football rules!


Cannonball is a segment that gives us a chance to take a closer look at albums that should be considered classics, to find out what makes them great. Author Nathan Rabin makes a case for why Weird Al Yankovic in 3-D deserves to be added to the canon of classic albums. Nathan is a writer – he’s covered pop culture for AV Club and The Dissolve, among others. His latest book is an dive into Weird Al – The Weird Accordion to Al: Every “Weird Al” Yankovic Album Obsessively Analyzed. The 500 page expanded edition leaves no stone left unturned in the Weird Al oeuvre. Rabin stops by to obsessively analyze this classic Weird Al album – including songs like: “Eat It,” “Mr. Popeil” and “King of Suede.” Plus, how Weird Al inadvertently might have created horrorcore with the track “Nature Trail to Hell.”


Bullseye producer Kevin Ferguson chats with the actor about how fans still resonate with the character, his childhood and what it was like playing historical rival Thomas Edison to Ethan Hawke’s Tesla in their latest film.


Journalist Marilyn Chase joins Bullseye this week to talk about her new book, Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa, which celebrates the life and work of the legendary artist. She talks about Ruth’s early life and influences, her experiences while in a Japanese-American internment camp during World War II, and her lasting artistic legacy. All that on the next Bullseye!


When comedian and actor Ramy Youssef had the chance to make a TV show, he knew he wanted to write what he knew: his family, his childhood, his hometown. Hulu’s Ramy follows the life of a young Arab Muslim man living in New Jersey – much like Youssef’s personal experience. At different times, Ramy wonders what to do about his career, his love life and his family life. All stuff that’s pretty typical for a millennial of his age. One of the things that makes the show Ramy unique is how it talks about faith. It’s a show that explores complex themes in an engaging way. And it’s as compelling as it is funny. Recently, Ramy was nominated for three Emmys. Jordan Morris, in for Jesse, talks with Ramy Youssef about the Emmy-nominated show, and his own journey through faith. Plus, how self-deprecating humor has helped him collaborate with actors when working on the show.


Baseball week at Bullseye continues with a conversation with sports writer and author Eric Nusbaum. His new book “Stealing Home: Los Angeles, the Dodgers, and the Lives Caught in Between,” is all about the complicated history behind Dodger Stadium. When the team moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles in the mid-twentieth century the construction of a new stadium displaced hundreds of Mexican American families. The lifelong Dodgers fan talks to us about reckoning with this reality, the history of the team and his love of the game. Plus, he’ll reveal more about the lives of the community members who had their lives turned upside down. That’s on the next Bullseye.


This week, we’re talking baseball! Our guest is Bob Kendrick, the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City. He’s here to talk about the importance of Black Americans in shaping modern American baseball, the talent and legacy of the Negro Leagues players, and how he’s celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro Leagues. All that and more on this week’s Bullseye!


We lost an incredible comic legend this summer: Carl Reiner. Carl’s career in comedy spanned seven decades. He got his start during World War II. Carl did it all – he went on to perform on stage, radio, TV and movies. Alongside Sid Caesar, he performed on the pioneering Your Show of Shows. Carl created the Dick Van Dyke Show, one of the greatest TV shows of all time. He co-wrote and directed Steve Martin’s The Jerk. Mel Brooks was his collaborator and best friend. The two of them would hang out together pretty much every day. We’re taking a moment to remember Carl Reiner. He was also a prolific writer with more than two dozen book titles to his name. When we spoke in 2017 he had recently released a memoir, Too Busy to Die. Carl was nice enough to invite us to his home for the interview to talk about his time in the army, his legacy and his relationship with Mel Brooks.


This week, we return to our interview from last year with the great Amy Sherman Palladino. She’s the creator of the hit television show “The Gilmore Girls” as well as the critically-acclaimed series “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” Her signature writing style is beautifully verbose with characters often expressing themselves with clever “blink and you’ll miss them” – style zingers that reward those willing to pay extra attention to the dialogue. Her work on Maisel includes all of the above as well as ensuring that everything down to the set decoration is accurate to the era she’s depicting. Amy chats with Bullseye about making the decision to leave behind ballet to pursue television writing, pushing forward creatively despite setbacks and the impact her parents had on her career choices. Plus, we make some room to talk about bringing 1960s New York to life.


Maximum Fun’s Carrie Poppy (Oh No, Ross and Carrie!) interviews comic actor and writer Julia Sweeney! You probably saw Julia’s work on Saturday Night Live in the early ’90s alongside Chris Rock, Dana Carvey, and Chris Farley. These days, you can see her on Showtime’s Work in Progress. In it, she plays a fictionalized version of herself who has to answer for the damage done by one of her most well known SNL characters: Pat. You can also catch her on the Hulu comedy Shrill. Julia plays Vera, mother to main character Annie. The show talks a lot about body image issues – and how family, especially our parents can sometimes exacerbate those feelings. Carrie Poppy chats with Julia about her work on stage. Plus, her complicated relationship with SNL‘s Pat and how they fit into Work in Progress. We also get into the type of mother she is in real life in relation to her character on Shrill.


Our guest this week is filmmaker, Kelly Reichardt! Kelly’s new film, First Cow, is the story of a loner cook who befriends a Chinese immigrant while traveling across 1820’s Oregon and the cow whose milk they hatch a plan to steal. Kelly joins us to talk about how a Floridian ended up making films about the Pacific Northwest, why she’s not really interested in show business, and how a person goes about casting a cow! All that and more on Bullseye!


FANTI Podcast hosts Jarrett Hill and Tre’vell Anderson are taking over Bullseye this week! Next up, Tre’vell’s interview with Katori Hall. She’s an award-winning playwright. Her most acclaimed work is perhaps The Mountaintop. It imagines Martin Luther King’s last night on earth at the Lorraine Motel. These days, she’s the creator and showrunner of the new Starz show P-Valley. It’s based on a play of hers by the same name. It’s set in a place called The Pynk – a strip club in the Mississippi Delta. The show focuses on the people who work in the club: the women on stage, the bouncers, the bartenders, and the boss: Uncle Clifford. Tre’vell Anderson chats with Katori about the show and where it fits into the broad conversation of stripping and sex work. Plus, where she got the idea for the show and embracing the humanity of this often overlooked industry.


FANTI Podcast hosts Jarrett Hill and Tre’vell Anderson are taking over Bullseye this week! First up, we have Jarrett’s interview with Norm Lewis. The Broadway veteran and Tony-award winning actor has appeared in hit shows like Scandal and was the first African American actor to step into the lead role in “The Phantom of the Opera” on Broadway. He appears in the new Spike Lee film “Da 5 Bloods” about a group of lifelong friends and Vietnam vets returning to the country after decades to fulfill a pact. Norm chats with us about creating a realistic portrayal of the impact of PTSD on Black war vets, his work on Broadway and how stage actors are finding new ways to channel their creativity during quarantine. Plus, he talks to us about how a random bar singing contest gave him his start in the creative arts. All that and more on Bullseye!


Odds are, you know actor Sarah Snook from her role on HBO’s Succession – one of the most acclaimed TV dramas in the last decade. She plays Siobhan Roy, but to her friends and family, it’s just “Shiv.” She is the youngest child and the only daughter in an ultra-wealthy family. The patriarch, Logan Roy, is the head of a large media conglomerate, Waystar Royco. Succession is a show about … well, succession. Shiv’s brothers feud constantly hoping to be the next to lead the family empire, and at first, she’s happy to let her brothers fight it out. But like pretty much every character on Succession, it doesn’t take long for the cracks to show. Linda Holmes, the host of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour, talked with Sarah about what it’s like to play one of the most fascinating, complex and confounding characters on television today. Plus, what Sarah hopes Shiv will get to do in Succession‘s third season.


Actor-comedian extraordinaire Matt Berry is our guest this week! Matt currently stars on the FX series What We Do in the Shadows, a show about a group of vampires living in current-day Staten Island. Matt joins us to talk about playing a vampire, where he got the inspiration for his Toast of London character, and how writing songs from the perspective of a serial killer really boosted his career. All that and more on Bullseye!


Trash Talk got their start playing DIY venues in Northern California more than a decade ago. They’ve since gone on to play their energetic, cutting version of hardcore punk in front of crowds at music festivals like Coachella and Camp Flog Gnaw. The music they play is fast. It’s loud. Very aggressive. Think along the lines of Black Flag or Suicidal Tendencies with a bit of thrash metal thrown in. Jordan Morris chats with bassist Spencer Pollard, singer Lee Spielman and guitarist Garrett Stevenson of Trash Talk. They talk about their new EP Squalor and what makes the crowds at the band’s shows so different from most punk shows. Trash Talk will be hitting the road once it’s safe to do so – but for now Squalor is perfect for a circle pit in your living room if you’re looking to let out any pent up rage during quarantine.


Rose Bryne chooses interesting characters. She was nominated for both an Emmy and a Golden Globe for her portrayal of “Ellen Parsons”— a ruthless lawyer on the critically-acclaimed law drama “Damages.” There’s also her role as Helen Harris III in 2011’s ensemble comedy Bridesmaids. This year, you can catch her in the political comedy “Irresistible.” It’s directed by John Stewart and stars Steve Carell. Guest host Jordan Morris chats with Rose about what it was like to work with the former “The Daily Show” host, perfecting the American accent and how Megyn Kelly inspired her role in the film. Plus, she’ll tell us what it was like to be in a Star Wars movie!


We revisit our conversation with Mary Randolph Carter. “Carter,” as she’s known, is the best-selling author of several books on the subject of “junk.” Her latest is called “The Joy of Junk: Go Right Ahead, Fall In Love With The Wackiest Things, Find The Worth In The Worthless, Rescue & Recycle The Curious Objects That Give Life & Happiness.” It’s all about the beauty and lessons that can be found through the art of thrifting. She’s also a creative director at Ralph Lauren! We talk to Carter about how her upbringing shaped her connection to “stuff,” her favorite junk journeys and how a trip to The Outer Banks during hurricane season helped prepare her for a career in treasure-hunting. Plus, we’ll chat about her experience working with the acclaimed design house.


We’ll revisit our conversation with the one and only Lin-Manuel Miranda! He’s probably best known as the star and creator of the biggest musical in the last 20 years – “Hamilton.” The award-winning, massively influential musical about the founding father Alexander Hamilton. You’ll be able to watch a film version of “Hamilton” on Disney Plus starting July 3rd. Later that month, the documentary “We Are Freestyle Love Supreme” will premiere on Hulu. The film tells the story of the hip-hop improv group Freestyle Love Supreme, which he co-founded long before “Hamilton” fame. And if that wasn’t enough – Lin’s starring in the HBO show “His Dark Materials.” It’s a fantasy series based on the book by the same name. Lin-Manuel Miranda talks about how his career has changed since “Hamilton.” We’ll also talk about the time he turned down a part in a Marvel movie.


Gene Luen Yang has written a lot of critically acclaimed graphic novels: “American Born Chinese,” “Boxers & Saints,” “The Shadow Hero,” and graphic novel series “Secret Coders.” Four years ago, he won a MacArthur “genius” grant. An honor that isn’t given to many comics creators. These days Gene’s working at DC Comics as a writer of the “New Superman” comics. He’s got two new books out now. “Superman Smashes the Klan” pits America’s favorite superhero against the KKK. The other book, “Dragon Hoops” is a memoir about his time as a high school teacher in Oakland, following his school’s basketball team. Jordan Morris fills in for Jesse on the latest episode. Gene and Jordan geek out about Marvel superheroes, DC Comics, and attending comic conventions. They’ll also talk at length about the decision to pit Superman against the KKK and discuss Superman as an allegory for US immigrant experience.


Guest host Jordan Morris of Maximum Fun’s Jordan, Jesse, Go! and Bubble chats with actor, director Rob McElhenney about his career. Rob’s the creator and star of the what will soon become the longest running American sitcome of all time— It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. It’s a show about five friends who are just about the most terrible people you’ve ever met and their weekly antics as they run a bar in South Philadelphia and try to scam their way out of and into just about every situation imaginable. His latest series is called Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet. It’s about the gaming industry and he’s re-teamed with a few of his Sunny writing partners. We’ll talk to Rob about growing up without a Nintendo in the house, bringing honesty to his projects and how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted his show’ production. Plus, we’ll chat about some of his favorite games growing up. That’s on the next Bullseye!


It’s a collaboration that’s lasted 35 years now and is still going strong. Amy Ray and Emily Saliers – Indigo Girls! They’re the duo behind the songs “Closer to Fine,” “Galileo,” “The Power of Two,” and so many other darling folk rock classics. Amy and Emily have been writing, arranging and performing together since high school. They recorded these quiet, beautiful melodies, usually using pretty simple arrangements: an acoustic guitar, maybe a mandolin or electric guitar added for flourish. The band has a new album that dropped last month, it’s called Look Long. Guest host Linda Holmes chats with Amy and Emily about the new record. What it’s like to parent during quarantine. Plus, we chat about their eclectic taste in music. Find out which Indigo Girl is listening to Young Thug these days!


We’re joined by guest host Linda Holmes for a very special interview with Giancarlo Esposito. Giancarlo plays Gus Fring, the brilliant villain on Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul. He also played Buggin’ Out in Do The Right Thing, Spike Lee’s masterpiece. Esposito talks us about the complexity of his characters, his time on The Electric Company and his work on Do the Right Thing. Plus, we’ll talk to him about a very difficult time in his life and working through the trauma of racial profiling.


We’re joined by guest host Linda Holmes as we highlight some of our favorite recent episodes. This week, we’re taking a look back at our interview with multi-talented performer Daveed Diggs. He’s an actor of stage and screen appearing in projects including Zootopia and Black-ish. In 2018, he co-wrote, produced and starred in Blindspotting alongside his lifelong friend Rafael Casal. He’s also the lead vocalist for hip hop group Clipping. His latest projects include the animated series Central Park and the television adaptation of Snowpiercer. We’ll talk to Diggs about his musical inspirations, the merits of “corniness” and how Lin Manuel Miranda changed his life. Plus, we’ll talk to him about Hamilton, of course! That’s on the next Bullseye!


The Craziest Day of My Entire Career is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite people about some truly unbelievable stories. This time around, we’re joined by actor Doug Jones. He often portrays non-human creatures with the help of visual effects, prosthetics and heavy make-up. You’ve seen him in “The Shape of Water” as the amphibian man – and as the terrifying faun with eyes in his palms in “Pan’s Labyrinth.” When we asked him about the craziest day of his entire career, he took us back to 1998 to the set of the film “Bug Buster.” During filming, he had an unforgettable run in with Randy Quaid. You can check out Doug Jones’ latest work on “Star Trek: Discovery” on CBS: All Access and “What We Do In The Shadows” on FX Now.


You know Elisabeth Moss for her roles on Mad Men and The Handmaid’s Tale. Or maybe you’re a West Wing fan and waited with baited breath to see if Zoey and Charlie would end up together. Her new film Shirley is a semi-biographical tale based on the life and work of horror writer, Shirley Jackson. Elisabeth joins us this week to talk about adding Producer to her resume, her fascination with playing women accused of losing their minds, and, of course, her iconic role in the 1991 Hulk Hogan comedy Suburban Commando.


This week, we’re doing something a little different: looking back on the work of Jim Coyle and Mal Sharpe. Two brilliant comedians, decades ahead of their time. The comedy duo recorded a series of hilarious and bizarre man-on-the-street records in the 1960s. They’d approach people with usually an absurd proposition: let’s rob a bank together. Let’s give a stranger a child. Let’s become one person – all all three of us. Deeply weird and deeply funny questions. Jim Coyle died in 1993. Mal Sharpe died this past March. He was 83. We’re taking time to remember the comedy duo by revisiting a couple conversations with Mal Sharpe. The conversations are some of the first celebrity interviews on the show, back when it was called The Sound of Young America. We’ll also listen to some classic Coyle and Sharpe vox populi interviews.


This week we are excited to be joined by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, the legendary co-creating and writing team behind 30 Rock and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, two of the funniest TV shows ever! Tina and Robert join us to talk about their new Netflix special, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs The Reverend, an interactive, choose-your- own-adventure style episode. Plus we’ll talk to them about how their partnership began on SNL, how they developed the idea for Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and their two new upcoming projects.That’s on the next Bullseye!


Maybe you’re looking for a distraction. Maybe it’s a TV show. One that can transport somewhere else. Perhaps it’s a world where iguanas are mail carriers, and lawn hedges are trimmed with shaving cream and razors. “Three Busy Debras” is a weird show. It’s set in the fictional town of Lemoncurd, Connecticut. It’s a pristine, filthy rich suburb where pretty much everyone drives SUVs and owns a huge, perfect house. It follows the day-to-day lives of three housewives. All named Debra. They’re all a bit deranged. They brunch a lot. They kind of hate each other, but they hang out all the time. There’s a lot of strange things that make the show surreal, off-beat, hilarious and totally unique. We’ll chat with the creative minds behind “Three Busy Debras”: Sandy Honig, Mitra Jouhari and Alyssa Stonoha. They’ll explain what it means to be a Debra, and where they initially got the idea of the Debras. Plus, what it was like to perform at Carnegie Hall.


We’re joined by comedian Eugene Mirman! The comedian and writer has opened for comedy duo Flight of the Conchords and played Yvgeny Mirminsky on Adult Swim’s Delocated. He is also the voice of “Gene Belcher” on the popular Fox animated series Bob’s Burgers. We’ll talk about his latest project, a documentary titled It Started as a Joke. It’s about Brooklyn’s alt comedy scene as well as a personal story about his family. Eugene joins Bullseye to discuss dealing with grief, defining space in his life for silliness and why community is so important to him. All that and more on the next Bullseye!


This week, we’re joined by the great Nikki Glaser! Nikki has been a star in the standup community for years, but she’s probably best known for her performances on Comedy Central’s Celebrity Roasts where her devastating one-liners really get to shine. She joins us to talk about her latest stand-up special Bangin’. Plus, she shares how she’s keeping busy during quarantine, how she felt the first time she did standup, and what it’s like to be a woman in comedy.


We’re joined by the great Christoph Waltz! We’ll talk about his breakout role in Inglourious Basterds – Quentin Tarantino’s bonkers World War II action thriller. At the time, Waltz was a relative newcomer to American films. His role as Colonel Hans Landa earned him not only his first ever Academy Award nomination, but also his first Academy Award. Almost overnight, he became an American movie star: The Green Hornet, Django Unchained, the most recent James Bond movies. His latest project is Most Dangerous Game on the mobile streaming platform Quibi. It’s a retelling of the classic short story by Richard Connell. We chat about that, dive into his Opera career, how he stumbled into acting, and so much more!


This is a tough episode for the Bullseye team. The late Bill Withers passed away last month at the age of 81. We look back at our two interviews with the soul singer responsible for such classics as “Ain’t No Sunshine,” “Lean on Me” and “Grandma’s Hands” His unique and soulful baritone and intonation coupled with his thoughtful lyrics and down to earth aesthetic ran counter to the more flashy acts of his time and earned him three Grammy awards before he decided to leave the industry on his own terms in the mid 80s. In 2015 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Two of his songs are even in the Grammy Hall of Fame! We look back at the life of the man, the myths behind why he left the industry and the soul of the artist. Bill also talked to us about charting his own course to happiness in life.


Cartoonist Ben Katchor is our guest. Ben is probably best known for his comic strip Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer, a comic about small businessman who roams the city capturing pictures of a fading ideal of New York. His newest work is the graphic novel, The Dairy Restaurant, a history of the Jewish restaurants that served as a kind of counterpart to the delicatessen. Ben joins us to talk about the dairy restaurants of his youth, what he calls our “pastoral impulse” to find good food, and the first place he’s going once he can break quarantine.


It’s Ed Helms, everyone! Helms got his start as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Then he was on the Office. Then, a little old movie called The Hangover. Ed Helms joins to chat about how all those projects changed his life. Plus: his latest role as a Detroit Police officer in the buddy cop comedy Coffee & Kareem.